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Moodle: NKN's Online Learning Management

As we have all seen the past few weeks, online learning can be a valuable tool for educators, students, and workers alike. Read about how NKN utilizes the open source learning management system Moodle to provide training for the wildland fire community.

Moodle 
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Current Conservation Goals “Overlook Genetic Diversity”

20 researchers from around the world have agreed in a letter, published in Science on March 6, that the new goals drafted by the Convention on Biological Diversity this year do not sufficiently consider genetic diversity.

Read the Letter 
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Alumni Story: Hannah Marx

Read Hannah's story: from her start in research, to the University of Idaho, to her new faculty position at the University of New Mexico.

Hannah's Research 
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2020 Cover Initiative

Get the details about IBEST's plan to help you showcase your work and expand your research impact.

Email Us 
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2019 Highly Cited Researcher Series: Luke Harmon

Read interviews with influential U of I researchers in our 2019 Highly Cited Researcher Series. Luke Harmon is a Professor in the Biology Department, and one of four faculty from the University of Idaho recognized by Web of Science Group as a highly cited researcher in 2019.

Highly Cited Researchers 
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Grad Student Feature: Kenetta Nunn

Dr. Kenetta Nunn is the newest graduate of the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Doctoral Program. Read her story and learn about her journey to the University of Idaho and through grad school.

Kenetta Nunn 
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2019 Highly Cited Researcher Series: John Abatzoglou

Read interviews with influential U of I researchers in our 2019 Highly Cited Researcher Series. John Abatzoglou is an Associate Professor in the Geography Department, and one of four faculty from the University of Idaho recognized by Web of Science Group as a highly cited researcher in 2019.

Highly Cited Researchers 
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2019 Highly Cited Researcher Series: Paul Hohenlohe

Read interviews with influential U of I researchers in our 2019 Highly Cited Researcher Series. Paul Hohenlohe is an Associate Professor in the Biological Sciences Department, and one of four faculty from the University of Idaho recognized by Web of Science Group as a highly cited researcher in 2019.

Highly Cited Researchers 
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Not So Slow After All

Researchers from the Parent Lab in the Biological Sciences Department recently published a paper in the Journal of Heredity about the colonization and speciation sequence in Galapagos endemic land snails. Contributors include U of I researchers and grad students, as well as students and faculty from other universities.

Read the Paper 
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Satellites on the Homestead

The RangeSAT project is a collection of user-based web tools for ranchers & land managers that aims to improve land management practices for grazing. It uses vegetation information from satellite imagery to help farmers sustainably graze their livestock. This project embodies collaboration between researchers, ranchers, and organizations in many fields.

Visit NKN 
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Grad Student Develops Program to Increase Accuracy of Community Formation Processes

Ph.D. candidates Megan Ruffley, Katie Peterson, and Bob Week recently had a paper published in Ecology and Evolution titled “Identifying Models of Trait-Mediated Community Assembly Using Random Forests and Approximate Bayesian Computation”. This publication is the second chapter of Ruffley’s dissertation and the culmination of her lab rotation in Luke Harmon’s lab.

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Getting the Timing Right

Undergraduate researcher Courtney Schreiner, from Scott Nuismer's lab, just had her first paper published in the British Ecological Society’s Journal of Applied Ecology—no small feat for an undergraduate student. Schreiner’s paper entails her research on the timing of vaccinations for wildlife populations. Many infectious diseases in humans and domesticated animals come from wildlife populations, hence the importance of studies like these.

Read the Paper 
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Jill Johnson Receives $1 Million NIH Grant

Jill Johnson from the Biological Sciences department was awarded a 1 million dollar NIH grant. The grant is the result of an IBEST-funded pilot project, and will allow her to further study the Hsp90 function. Hsp90 is a global cellular regulator that controls the function of up to 15% of all cellular proteins, including many proteins that drive cancerous cell growth. Drugs that target Hsp90 block the function of cancer-causing proteins and stop tumor growth but are too toxic for general use. With this grant, Johnson and her collaborators hope to provide research that aids in the development of more selective and less toxic Hsp90-inhibiting drugs.

Full Story 
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Domestic Sheep Swabbed for Movi Bacteria

Wrestling sheep on a cold morning in order to swab their noses may sound strange, but what researchers learn from these swabs could help protect the sheep in the long run. Kim Andrews from the GRC took nasal swabs from over 75 young sheep on October 17, with the help of the University of Idaho Sheep Center team and Thibault Stalder from Eva Top's lab. These samples will soon be tested for Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae (Movi). This is the beginning of a study that aims to eventually aid in the creation of a vaccine to protect sheep against the Movi bacteria.

See Photos Here 
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Bacteria in the Human Vagina that Produce D-Lactic Acid Promote Resistance to Chlamydial Infections

Department of Biological Sciences Distinguished Professor Dr. Larry Forney, in collaboration with researchers from the University of Maryland, recently published a paper entitled “The cervicovaginal microbiota-host interaction modulated Chlamydia trachomatis infection” in the journal mBio that detailed their most recent study of the vaginal microbiome. Their research revealed mechanisms by which D-lactic acid produced by bacteria in the vagina might help protect women against Chlamydia trachomatis. These findings may enable the development of novel microbiome-based therapeutic strategies to protect women from infections and improve vaginal and cervical health.

Read the Paper 
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Polymorphic Games Receives Grant for Evolutionary Mobile Game

Professor Barrie Robison recently received a $74,700 IGEM grant from the Idaho State Board of Education. He and co-PI Terence Soule will use the grant to create a mobile version of the first game produced by the Polymorphic Games Studio, entitled “Darwin’s Demons”. The new version of Darwin’s Demons, will bring evolutionary procedural content generation into the world of mobile gaming. This technique uses evolutionary models to evolve original game content as the game progresses rather than relying on pre-programmed content—an innovative programming approach developed by Polymorphic Games. The studio has released two commercial games so far that utilize evolutionary procedural content generation, and both games get more difficult over time as the opponents’ appearance, behavior, and traits adapt to the choices and strategy of the player.

Polymorphic Games